Up in the air: an examination of the work–life balance of fly-in–fly-out academics

Juraifa Jais, Kosmas X. Smyrnios, Lynnel A. Hoare

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a dearth of research on the work–life balance experiences of academics who undertake short-term international teaching assignments. Academics who teach offshore are also accountable for onshore activities including lecturing, research, supervision of higher degree students, mentoring, publishing and administrative obligations inter alia. These responsibilities pose further challenges to work and life. Within the context of a qualitative design, 11 academics were interviewed in depth regarding their short-term international teaching experiences. Specific issues relating to family separation, excessive work hours, poor assignment planning and lack of organisational recognition were identified. Findings have important implications for academics, and university policy and practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1123-1137
Number of pages15
JournalHigher Education Research and Development
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02 Nov 2015

Fingerprint

work-life-balance
examination
university policy
Teaching
mentoring
supervision
obligation
experience
responsibility
planning
lack
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

@article{fa25e002484e4a36a44701a9db5e0472,
title = "Up in the air: an examination of the work–life balance of fly-in–fly-out academics",
abstract = "There is a dearth of research on the work–life balance experiences of academics who undertake short-term international teaching assignments. Academics who teach offshore are also accountable for onshore activities including lecturing, research, supervision of higher degree students, mentoring, publishing and administrative obligations inter alia. These responsibilities pose further challenges to work and life. Within the context of a qualitative design, 11 academics were interviewed in depth regarding their short-term international teaching experiences. Specific issues relating to family separation, excessive work hours, poor assignment planning and lack of organisational recognition were identified. Findings have important implications for academics, and university policy and practice.",
author = "Juraifa Jais and Smyrnios, {Kosmas X.} and Hoare, {Lynnel A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/07294360.2015.1024623",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "1123--1137",
journal = "Higher Education Research and Development",
issn = "0729-4360",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "6",

}

Up in the air : an examination of the work–life balance of fly-in–fly-out academics. / Jais, Juraifa; Smyrnios, Kosmas X.; Hoare, Lynnel A.

In: Higher Education Research and Development, Vol. 34, No. 6, 02.11.2015, p. 1123-1137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Up in the air

T2 - an examination of the work–life balance of fly-in–fly-out academics

AU - Jais, Juraifa

AU - Smyrnios, Kosmas X.

AU - Hoare, Lynnel A.

PY - 2015/11/2

Y1 - 2015/11/2

N2 - There is a dearth of research on the work–life balance experiences of academics who undertake short-term international teaching assignments. Academics who teach offshore are also accountable for onshore activities including lecturing, research, supervision of higher degree students, mentoring, publishing and administrative obligations inter alia. These responsibilities pose further challenges to work and life. Within the context of a qualitative design, 11 academics were interviewed in depth regarding their short-term international teaching experiences. Specific issues relating to family separation, excessive work hours, poor assignment planning and lack of organisational recognition were identified. Findings have important implications for academics, and university policy and practice.

AB - There is a dearth of research on the work–life balance experiences of academics who undertake short-term international teaching assignments. Academics who teach offshore are also accountable for onshore activities including lecturing, research, supervision of higher degree students, mentoring, publishing and administrative obligations inter alia. These responsibilities pose further challenges to work and life. Within the context of a qualitative design, 11 academics were interviewed in depth regarding their short-term international teaching experiences. Specific issues relating to family separation, excessive work hours, poor assignment planning and lack of organisational recognition were identified. Findings have important implications for academics, and university policy and practice.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949536287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949536287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/07294360.2015.1024623

DO - 10.1080/07294360.2015.1024623

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84949536287

VL - 34

SP - 1123

EP - 1137

JO - Higher Education Research and Development

JF - Higher Education Research and Development

SN - 0729-4360

IS - 6

ER -