Knowledge management systems success in healthcare

Leadership matters

Nor'Ashikin Ali, Alexei Tretiakov, Dick Whiddett, Inga Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To deliver high-quality healthcare doctors need to access, interpret, and share appropriate and localised medical knowledge. Information technology is widely used to facilitate the management of this knowledge in healthcare organisations. The purpose of this study is to develop a knowledge management systems success model for healthcare organisations. Method A model was formulated by extending an existing generic knowledge management systems success model by including organisational and system factors relevant to healthcare. It was tested by using data obtained from 263 doctors working within two district health boards in New Zealand. Results Of the system factors, knowledge content quality was found to be particularly important for knowledge management systems success. Of the organisational factors, leadership was the most important, and more important than incentives. Conclusion Leadership promoted knowledge management systems success primarily by positively affecting knowledge content quality. Leadership also promoted knowledge management use for retrieval, which should lead to the use of that better quality knowledge by the doctors, ultimately resulting in better outcomes for patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-340
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Medical Informatics
Volume97
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2017

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Knowledge Management
Delivery of Health Care
Organizational Models
Quality of Health Care
New Zealand
Motivation
Technology
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Ali, Nor'Ashikin ; Tretiakov, Alexei ; Whiddett, Dick ; Hunter, Inga. / Knowledge management systems success in healthcare : Leadership matters. In: International Journal of Medical Informatics. 2017 ; Vol. 97. pp. 331-340.
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Knowledge management systems success in healthcare : Leadership matters. / Ali, Nor'Ashikin; Tretiakov, Alexei; Whiddett, Dick; Hunter, Inga.

In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, Vol. 97, 01.01.2017, p. 331-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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