Investigating the role of composition conventions in three-move mate problems

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In improving the quality of their chess problems or compositions for tournaments and possibly publication in magazines, composers usually rely on 'good practice' rules which are known as 'conventions'. These might include, contain no unnecessary moves to illustrate a theme and avoid castling moves because it cannot be proved legal. Often, conventions are thought to increase the perceived beauty or aesthetics of a problem. We used a computer program that incorporated a previously validated computational aesthetics model to analyze three sets of compositions and one set of comparable three-move sequences taken from actual games. Each of these varied in terms of their typical adherence to conventions. We found evidence that adherence to conventions, in principle, contributes to aesthetics in chess problems - as perceived by the majority of players and composers with sufficient domain knowledge - but only to a limited degree. Furthermore, it is likely that not all conventions contribute equally to beauty and some might even have an inverse effect. These findings suggest two main things. First, composers need not concern themselves too much with conventions if their intention is simply to make their compositions appear more beautiful to most solvers and observers. Second, should they decide to adhere to conventions, they should be highly selective of the ones that appeal to their target audience, i.e. those with esoteric knowledge of the domain or 'outsiders' who likely understand beauty in chess as something quite different.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEntertainment Computing - 12th International Conference, ICEC 2013, Proceedings
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages61-68
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9783642411052
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2013
Event12th International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2013 - Sao Paulo, Brazil
Duration: 16 Oct 201318 Oct 2013

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume8215 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other12th International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2013
CountryBrazil
CitySao Paulo
Period16/10/1318/10/13

Fingerprint

Chemical analysis
Computer program listings
Likely
Appeal
Domain Knowledge
Tournament
Thing
Observer
Game
Sufficient
Target
Aesthetics
Model

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Mohamed Iqbal, M. A. (2013). Investigating the role of composition conventions in three-move mate problems. In Entertainment Computing - 12th International Conference, ICEC 2013, Proceedings (pp. 61-68). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 8215 LNCS). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41106-9_7
Mohamed Iqbal, Mohammed Azlan. / Investigating the role of composition conventions in three-move mate problems. Entertainment Computing - 12th International Conference, ICEC 2013, Proceedings. Springer Verlag, 2013. pp. 61-68 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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Mohamed Iqbal, MA 2013, Investigating the role of composition conventions in three-move mate problems. in Entertainment Computing - 12th International Conference, ICEC 2013, Proceedings. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 8215 LNCS, Springer Verlag, pp. 61-68, 12th International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2013, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 16/10/13. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41106-9_7

Investigating the role of composition conventions in three-move mate problems. / Mohamed Iqbal, Mohammed Azlan.

Entertainment Computing - 12th International Conference, ICEC 2013, Proceedings. Springer Verlag, 2013. p. 61-68 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 8215 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Mohamed Iqbal MA. Investigating the role of composition conventions in three-move mate problems. In Entertainment Computing - 12th International Conference, ICEC 2013, Proceedings. Springer Verlag. 2013. p. 61-68. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41106-9_7