Estimating time to completion

Uncertain processing times in games

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this article we propose a method that enables computer programmers to generate an estimate of the time remaining in tasks that have uncertain or theoretically unpredictable processing times. The method uses the real-time mean given the time presently elapsed and the number of task components completed thus far in order to predict or estimate the amount of time remaining for the overall task. Experimental results based on a board game task in two categories suggest that the estimate can be considered reliable (i.e. within a 10% margin of error) not very long after the task has begun; in general, after approximately just 20% of it has been completed. The estimated time to completion is particularly meaningful to end-users who are otherwise just left waiting, or having to leave and return many times to check if the task has completed. The method, in principle, can be applied also to different tasks with uncertain processing times, game-related or otherwise.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games
Subtitle of host publicationAI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games
Pages59-62
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Sep 2011
Event16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games, CGAMES'2011 - Louisville, KY, United States
Duration: 27 Jul 201130 Jul 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games

Other

Other16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games, CGAMES'2011
CountryUnited States
CityLouisville, KY
Period27/07/1130/07/11

Fingerprint

Processing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Cite this

Mohamed Iqbal, M. A. (2011). Estimating time to completion: Uncertain processing times in games. In Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games (pp. 59-62). [6000360] (Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games). https://doi.org/10.1109/CGAMES.2011.6000360
Mohamed Iqbal, Mohammed Azlan. / Estimating time to completion : Uncertain processing times in games. Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games. 2011. pp. 59-62 (Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games).
@inproceedings{2298f7e6fdba4fd98bd0f0257443f3d6,
title = "Estimating time to completion: Uncertain processing times in games",
abstract = "In this article we propose a method that enables computer programmers to generate an estimate of the time remaining in tasks that have uncertain or theoretically unpredictable processing times. The method uses the real-time mean given the time presently elapsed and the number of task components completed thus far in order to predict or estimate the amount of time remaining for the overall task. Experimental results based on a board game task in two categories suggest that the estimate can be considered reliable (i.e. within a 10{\%} margin of error) not very long after the task has begun; in general, after approximately just 20{\%} of it has been completed. The estimated time to completion is particularly meaningful to end-users who are otherwise just left waiting, or having to leave and return many times to check if the task has completed. The method, in principle, can be applied also to different tasks with uncertain processing times, game-related or otherwise.",
author = "{Mohamed Iqbal}, {Mohammed Azlan}",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1109/CGAMES.2011.6000360",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781457714504",
series = "Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games",
pages = "59--62",
booktitle = "Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games",

}

Mohamed Iqbal, MA 2011, Estimating time to completion: Uncertain processing times in games. in Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games., 6000360, Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games, pp. 59-62, 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games, CGAMES'2011, Louisville, KY, United States, 27/07/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/CGAMES.2011.6000360

Estimating time to completion : Uncertain processing times in games. / Mohamed Iqbal, Mohammed Azlan.

Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games. 2011. p. 59-62 6000360 (Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Estimating time to completion

T2 - Uncertain processing times in games

AU - Mohamed Iqbal, Mohammed Azlan

PY - 2011/9/28

Y1 - 2011/9/28

N2 - In this article we propose a method that enables computer programmers to generate an estimate of the time remaining in tasks that have uncertain or theoretically unpredictable processing times. The method uses the real-time mean given the time presently elapsed and the number of task components completed thus far in order to predict or estimate the amount of time remaining for the overall task. Experimental results based on a board game task in two categories suggest that the estimate can be considered reliable (i.e. within a 10% margin of error) not very long after the task has begun; in general, after approximately just 20% of it has been completed. The estimated time to completion is particularly meaningful to end-users who are otherwise just left waiting, or having to leave and return many times to check if the task has completed. The method, in principle, can be applied also to different tasks with uncertain processing times, game-related or otherwise.

AB - In this article we propose a method that enables computer programmers to generate an estimate of the time remaining in tasks that have uncertain or theoretically unpredictable processing times. The method uses the real-time mean given the time presently elapsed and the number of task components completed thus far in order to predict or estimate the amount of time remaining for the overall task. Experimental results based on a board game task in two categories suggest that the estimate can be considered reliable (i.e. within a 10% margin of error) not very long after the task has begun; in general, after approximately just 20% of it has been completed. The estimated time to completion is particularly meaningful to end-users who are otherwise just left waiting, or having to leave and return many times to check if the task has completed. The method, in principle, can be applied also to different tasks with uncertain processing times, game-related or otherwise.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80053107119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80053107119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/CGAMES.2011.6000360

DO - 10.1109/CGAMES.2011.6000360

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781457714504

T3 - Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games

SP - 59

EP - 62

BT - Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games

ER -

Mohamed Iqbal MA. Estimating time to completion: Uncertain processing times in games. In Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games. 2011. p. 59-62. 6000360. (Proceedings of CGAMES'2011 USA - 16th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Interactive Multimedia, Educational and Serious Games). https://doi.org/10.1109/CGAMES.2011.6000360