Corporate social responsibility and corporate governance in Malaysian government-linked companies

Elinda Esa, Nazli Anum Mohd Ghazali

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether there has been a change in the level of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure and to determine whether corporate governance attributes influence CSR disclosure in corporate annual reports of Malaysian government-linked companies (GLCs). Design/methodology/approach: The annual reports of 27 GLCs for two years (2005 and 2007) were analysed using content analysis. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify factors influencing CSR disclosure in annual reports. Findings: Consistent with expectations, the paired-sample t-tests showed that there was an increase (significant at the 1 percent level) in the extent of CSR disclosure. The multiple regression analysis revealed that board size was positively associated and statistically significant (at the 1 percent level) with the extent of CSR disclosure. Research limitations/implications: The regression model reported an R 2 of 33.9 percent, which means that almost 66 percent of factors influencing CSR disclosure in Malaysian GLCs have not been captured by the model. These other factors may perhaps be identified through other research methods such as questionnaire surveys or interviews. Practical implications: The findings appear to suggest that the government efforts in promoting CSR among GLCs through the introduction of the Silver Book in 2006 have had some positive impact on CSR disclosure in annual reports. The results also imply that larger board size through wider exchange of ideas and experience could lead to better appreciation and involvement in corporate social activities and hence disclosure in annual reports. Originality/value: This paper is one of the few studies to examine CSR disclosure and corporate governance attributes in GLCs after the introduction of new initiatives to promote CSR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-305
Number of pages14
JournalCorporate Governance (Bingley)
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jun 2012

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Corporate Social Responsibility
Government
Corporate governance
Disclosure
Annual reports
Multiple regression analysis
Board size
Influencing factors
Corporate annual reports
Factors
Design methodology
Regression model
Content analysis
T-test
Research methods
Questionnaire survey

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Corporate social responsibility and corporate governance in Malaysian government-linked companies. / Esa, Elinda; Ghazali, Nazli Anum Mohd.

In: Corporate Governance (Bingley), Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.06.2012, p. 292-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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