Compression rates of untreated and stabilized peat soils

Leong Sing Wong, Roslan Hashim, Faisal Haji Ali

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Characterized by high initial void ratio, organic content and water holding capacity, fibrous peat exhibits high compressibility and low shear strength. Consequently, formation of deep fibrous peat layer often poses difficulties in construction. In practice, compressibility of deep fibrous peat layer can be reduced by deep soil stabilization technique. The technique is developed in such a way that dry binders are mixed with in situ peat soil to form columnar reinforcement in the deep peat ground prior to preloading. Preloading simulations of both untreated and stabilized peats were carried out in laboratory by loading of both soils using standard oedometer consolidation apparatus. Ordinary Portland cement, ground granulated blast furnace slag and siliceous sand were used to stabilize the soil. Analysis on the time-compression curves from the tests revealed that coefficients of vertical consolidation (cv of both soils were best predicted using square root of t52.6 method when compared to those evaluated using conventional curve fitting methods. Main reason for this is the experimental time-compression curves for the method best fit its theoretical curve. In addition, the method predicts cv of soil at 52.6% average degree of consolidation, which is less likely to be affected by secondary compression that usually occurs concurrently at the later stage of soil primary consolidation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalElectronic Journal of Geotechnical Engineering
Volume13 F
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Peat
peat soil
compression
consolidation
peat
Soils
Consolidation
preloading
compressibility
soil
Compressibility
soil stabilization
void ratio
slag
shear strength
reinforcement
cement
Curve fitting
Portland cement
rate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

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abstract = "Characterized by high initial void ratio, organic content and water holding capacity, fibrous peat exhibits high compressibility and low shear strength. Consequently, formation of deep fibrous peat layer often poses difficulties in construction. In practice, compressibility of deep fibrous peat layer can be reduced by deep soil stabilization technique. The technique is developed in such a way that dry binders are mixed with in situ peat soil to form columnar reinforcement in the deep peat ground prior to preloading. Preloading simulations of both untreated and stabilized peats were carried out in laboratory by loading of both soils using standard oedometer consolidation apparatus. Ordinary Portland cement, ground granulated blast furnace slag and siliceous sand were used to stabilize the soil. Analysis on the time-compression curves from the tests revealed that coefficients of vertical consolidation (cv of both soils were best predicted using square root of t52.6 method when compared to those evaluated using conventional curve fitting methods. Main reason for this is the experimental time-compression curves for the method best fit its theoretical curve. In addition, the method predicts cv of soil at 52.6{\%} average degree of consolidation, which is less likely to be affected by secondary compression that usually occurs concurrently at the later stage of soil primary consolidation.",
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Compression rates of untreated and stabilized peat soils. / Wong, Leong Sing; Hashim, Roslan; Ali, Faisal Haji.

In: Electronic Journal of Geotechnical Engineering, Vol. 13 F, 2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Compression rates of untreated and stabilized peat soils

AU - Wong, Leong Sing

AU - Hashim, Roslan

AU - Ali, Faisal Haji

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Characterized by high initial void ratio, organic content and water holding capacity, fibrous peat exhibits high compressibility and low shear strength. Consequently, formation of deep fibrous peat layer often poses difficulties in construction. In practice, compressibility of deep fibrous peat layer can be reduced by deep soil stabilization technique. The technique is developed in such a way that dry binders are mixed with in situ peat soil to form columnar reinforcement in the deep peat ground prior to preloading. Preloading simulations of both untreated and stabilized peats were carried out in laboratory by loading of both soils using standard oedometer consolidation apparatus. Ordinary Portland cement, ground granulated blast furnace slag and siliceous sand were used to stabilize the soil. Analysis on the time-compression curves from the tests revealed that coefficients of vertical consolidation (cv of both soils were best predicted using square root of t52.6 method when compared to those evaluated using conventional curve fitting methods. Main reason for this is the experimental time-compression curves for the method best fit its theoretical curve. In addition, the method predicts cv of soil at 52.6% average degree of consolidation, which is less likely to be affected by secondary compression that usually occurs concurrently at the later stage of soil primary consolidation.

AB - Characterized by high initial void ratio, organic content and water holding capacity, fibrous peat exhibits high compressibility and low shear strength. Consequently, formation of deep fibrous peat layer often poses difficulties in construction. In practice, compressibility of deep fibrous peat layer can be reduced by deep soil stabilization technique. The technique is developed in such a way that dry binders are mixed with in situ peat soil to form columnar reinforcement in the deep peat ground prior to preloading. Preloading simulations of both untreated and stabilized peats were carried out in laboratory by loading of both soils using standard oedometer consolidation apparatus. Ordinary Portland cement, ground granulated blast furnace slag and siliceous sand were used to stabilize the soil. Analysis on the time-compression curves from the tests revealed that coefficients of vertical consolidation (cv of both soils were best predicted using square root of t52.6 method when compared to those evaluated using conventional curve fitting methods. Main reason for this is the experimental time-compression curves for the method best fit its theoretical curve. In addition, the method predicts cv of soil at 52.6% average degree of consolidation, which is less likely to be affected by secondary compression that usually occurs concurrently at the later stage of soil primary consolidation.

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