COMMUNITY RAINWATER HARVESTING FINANCIAL PAYBACK ANALYSES - CASE STUDY in MALAYSIA

Yoke Bee Woon, Lloyd Ling, Wei Lun Tan, Ming Fai Chow

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Malaysian water demand is increasing at an alarming rate reaching 27 to 38% higher than the World Health Organisation recommended consumption limit of 165 liters per capita per day. Therefore, the Malaysian water shortage crisis is quite possible in future due to this water demand uptrend. The average annual rainfall of Malaysia is 2,400 mm but large portion of this fresh water resource becomes runoff and lost through our catchments. Urban flash flood is also becoming more frequent due to fast pace of urban development and anthropogenic induced runoff. Malaysia has experienced drought and flooding in different areas and therefore, it is crucial to study the feasibility of alternate water resources in Malaysia to manage and maintain the sustainability of urban township. This study reviewed a past rain water harvesting system (RWHS) case and conducted the financial payback analyses on its proposed system. If there were 177 rain days per year with at least 52 mm of rainfall event depth, the payback period of the proposed RWHS would be 5.8 years when the discount rate (i%) = 2% and 8.2 years if i% = 10%. The payback period became longer when the annual rain days dropped below 106 and 89 rain days per year. If the proposed RWHS only serve the community under this study, it will take 12 days to consume 800 m3 stored water, while any rainfall of consecutive days will not be harvested as the underground storage tank is in full capacity. The proposed RWHS must be filled up at least 38 times per year in order to break even with the proposed annual maintenance cost but will never be able to achieve any payback from its initial investment. Rain water harvesting and full utilisation is the only way to achieve high water cost savings and shorter payback period, and maximise urban excess runoff reduction.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012019
JournalIOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering
Volume636
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2019
Event3rd International Conference on Architecture and Civil Engineering 2019, ICACE 2019 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Duration: 26 Jun 201927 Jun 2019

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Rain
Water
Runoff
Water resources
Drought
Catchments
Costs
Sustainable development
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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title = "COMMUNITY RAINWATER HARVESTING FINANCIAL PAYBACK ANALYSES - CASE STUDY in MALAYSIA",
abstract = "Malaysian water demand is increasing at an alarming rate reaching 27 to 38{\%} higher than the World Health Organisation recommended consumption limit of 165 liters per capita per day. Therefore, the Malaysian water shortage crisis is quite possible in future due to this water demand uptrend. The average annual rainfall of Malaysia is 2,400 mm but large portion of this fresh water resource becomes runoff and lost through our catchments. Urban flash flood is also becoming more frequent due to fast pace of urban development and anthropogenic induced runoff. Malaysia has experienced drought and flooding in different areas and therefore, it is crucial to study the feasibility of alternate water resources in Malaysia to manage and maintain the sustainability of urban township. This study reviewed a past rain water harvesting system (RWHS) case and conducted the financial payback analyses on its proposed system. If there were 177 rain days per year with at least 52 mm of rainfall event depth, the payback period of the proposed RWHS would be 5.8 years when the discount rate (i{\%}) = 2{\%} and 8.2 years if i{\%} = 10{\%}. The payback period became longer when the annual rain days dropped below 106 and 89 rain days per year. If the proposed RWHS only serve the community under this study, it will take 12 days to consume 800 m3 stored water, while any rainfall of consecutive days will not be harvested as the underground storage tank is in full capacity. The proposed RWHS must be filled up at least 38 times per year in order to break even with the proposed annual maintenance cost but will never be able to achieve any payback from its initial investment. Rain water harvesting and full utilisation is the only way to achieve high water cost savings and shorter payback period, and maximise urban excess runoff reduction.",
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COMMUNITY RAINWATER HARVESTING FINANCIAL PAYBACK ANALYSES - CASE STUDY in MALAYSIA. / Bee Woon, Yoke; Ling, Lloyd; Lun Tan, Wei; Fai Chow, Ming.

In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Vol. 636, No. 1, 012019, 15.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

TY - JOUR

T1 - COMMUNITY RAINWATER HARVESTING FINANCIAL PAYBACK ANALYSES - CASE STUDY in MALAYSIA

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AU - Ling, Lloyd

AU - Lun Tan, Wei

AU - Fai Chow, Ming

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Y1 - 2019/10/15

N2 - Malaysian water demand is increasing at an alarming rate reaching 27 to 38% higher than the World Health Organisation recommended consumption limit of 165 liters per capita per day. Therefore, the Malaysian water shortage crisis is quite possible in future due to this water demand uptrend. The average annual rainfall of Malaysia is 2,400 mm but large portion of this fresh water resource becomes runoff and lost through our catchments. Urban flash flood is also becoming more frequent due to fast pace of urban development and anthropogenic induced runoff. Malaysia has experienced drought and flooding in different areas and therefore, it is crucial to study the feasibility of alternate water resources in Malaysia to manage and maintain the sustainability of urban township. This study reviewed a past rain water harvesting system (RWHS) case and conducted the financial payback analyses on its proposed system. If there were 177 rain days per year with at least 52 mm of rainfall event depth, the payback period of the proposed RWHS would be 5.8 years when the discount rate (i%) = 2% and 8.2 years if i% = 10%. The payback period became longer when the annual rain days dropped below 106 and 89 rain days per year. If the proposed RWHS only serve the community under this study, it will take 12 days to consume 800 m3 stored water, while any rainfall of consecutive days will not be harvested as the underground storage tank is in full capacity. The proposed RWHS must be filled up at least 38 times per year in order to break even with the proposed annual maintenance cost but will never be able to achieve any payback from its initial investment. Rain water harvesting and full utilisation is the only way to achieve high water cost savings and shorter payback period, and maximise urban excess runoff reduction.

AB - Malaysian water demand is increasing at an alarming rate reaching 27 to 38% higher than the World Health Organisation recommended consumption limit of 165 liters per capita per day. Therefore, the Malaysian water shortage crisis is quite possible in future due to this water demand uptrend. The average annual rainfall of Malaysia is 2,400 mm but large portion of this fresh water resource becomes runoff and lost through our catchments. Urban flash flood is also becoming more frequent due to fast pace of urban development and anthropogenic induced runoff. Malaysia has experienced drought and flooding in different areas and therefore, it is crucial to study the feasibility of alternate water resources in Malaysia to manage and maintain the sustainability of urban township. This study reviewed a past rain water harvesting system (RWHS) case and conducted the financial payback analyses on its proposed system. If there were 177 rain days per year with at least 52 mm of rainfall event depth, the payback period of the proposed RWHS would be 5.8 years when the discount rate (i%) = 2% and 8.2 years if i% = 10%. The payback period became longer when the annual rain days dropped below 106 and 89 rain days per year. If the proposed RWHS only serve the community under this study, it will take 12 days to consume 800 m3 stored water, while any rainfall of consecutive days will not be harvested as the underground storage tank is in full capacity. The proposed RWHS must be filled up at least 38 times per year in order to break even with the proposed annual maintenance cost but will never be able to achieve any payback from its initial investment. Rain water harvesting and full utilisation is the only way to achieve high water cost savings and shorter payback period, and maximise urban excess runoff reduction.

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